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Rescuing Humanity…Lessons from The Cave

Allow me to digress from the normal writings on the virtues of the Digital Age, and focus on an event I found to be inspiring, touching, edifying and indeed almost spiritual in its essence. I must admit partiality to this occurrence not simply because of the great involvement of the sport, nay, the art of diving but because of the lengths to which people will go to save others. The seemingly unlimited capacity for commitment, for courage, for determination of the human spirit brought me to a place of surrender to the love, affection and humility of a people, of a nation and of this world. It was enlightening as it was strengthening in its reality, unforgettable in the memory and most gratifying in its outcome.


That people are willing to risk their own lives to save others is a trait not uncommon in this world today. While others are too busy pursuing their own agenda in this human existence, intensely focused on power, wealth, control and total dominance, some dedicate themselves to the saving of humanity and the preservation of life, unconditionally.

For eighteen days from June 23rd to July 10th, 2018, the world focused it’s gaze on the nation of Thailand, on the Pacific Rim. A group of twelve young boys and their Coach, went exploring the cave complex of Tham Luang Nang Non, found underneath a mountain range. This system of caves is about six (6) miles long. The group became stranded in the cave when a sudden deluge flooded the caves, just before the rainy season usually starts in July, almost halfway into the caves. It was the start of an unprecedented international effort to extricate the group of young footballers, The Wild Boars and bring them safely out of the caves.

The effort to rescue the boys and their coach included :

The rescue effort involved more than 10,000 people, including over 100 divers, many rescue workers, representatives from about 100 governmental agencies, 900 police officers and 2,000 soldiers, and required ten police helicopters, seven police ambulances, more than 700 diving cylinders.

They were summoned and came from all parts of the world. Seven (7) British divers, all civilians, and one an IT Consultant ( I just had to put that in 🙂) were key players in this unfolding drama. Nine Australians were honored by their government for the heroic work carried out. Chinese, American, people from Myanmar and Laos all came.

The planning was spot on as the assessment of the situation was accurate and well thought out by these highly experienced professional divers. An operation of that scale and magnitude has to be handled by experienced personnel.

It must be remembered that this was something that happened out of the blue, so to speak. It required sound judgement acquired from years of experience, along side the ability to think and act strategically, anticipating conditions, requirements and resource acquisition and allocation, “on the fly.” Quick thinking and action were needed to ensure the operations proceeded unabated.

That required the involvement of the Thai military to establish command and control to strategize, decide, plan and coordinate and control the effort. The effort though was led by Governor Narongsak Osatanakorn. According to Times he said “We did something nobody thought was possible.”

The logistical planning and execution of this exercise needed the precision and discipline of the Thai Navy Seals. These soldiers played a critical role in this rescue operation and to have observed and recognized their performance in the jigsaw of myriads of other components was just reward for a job well done. Their training and ability to utilize the wisdom obtained from that training and experience was exemplary in the lesson of mass cooperation to get the job done.

As a management/technology professional it was simply spellbinding to observe, analyze, assess, assimilate and synthesize this operation from all angles not just managerial competence of professional conduct or courtesy.

The lessons of understanding flexibility, competence, humility, planning & decision -making, and execution whilst trusting the judgement and wisdom of highly trained professionals demonstrated such enlightened leadership, that I can’t wait to read the reports and opinions of management institutions such as a Harvard and Cambridge, for instance.

CEO, other senior executives, managers, employees throughout will be enriched by this experience in management and mindfulness straddling and enhancing the disciplines of strategic thinking, planning, execution and management.

But for now, it is such a great pleasure to be part of the fraternity of diving, for the justification of learning the skill, and enjoying it, because at some point in time, it might be needed to save lives.

The lessons of humility, and the spirituality of the Thai peoples are a source of continuing faith and energy to enrich the lives of others through an attitude of respect, cooperation, humility and peace. I am a great admirer of eastern philosophy, culture and traditions and this has been advanced, concretized and embedded in my own psyche, to pass on to others.

Thai people are simply great, beautiful and humble and for me at least it is humbling. Humility can overcome anything.

It was not about politics, it was not about race, it was not about power, but it was about giving unconditionally in the welfare of others.

The Thailand response was, in my mind, a lesson to the world in the appreciation of life and what life itself means. Thailand undoubtedly celebrated their strength of culture and traditions of caring, of appreciating, and of respecting life.

Today, I celebrate Thailand, its peoples, its traditions, its culture, its deep spiritual presence in a world that desperately needs peace, cooperation, humility and respect for human life. Today it celebrate their spirit, their outlook on life and their contribution to world culture and its betterment by way of their example of gratitude, simplicity, quiet strength and courage and power to face an unknown outcome with steely resolve and faith.

Thailand illuminates an often dull and unforgiving space and provides guidance worthy of emulation, like a lighthouse for ships in stormy seas, and a might-house for us to find strength and courage and determination to live a virtuous and good life.

Thank you Thailand!


Bibliography

https://www.straitstimes.com/asia/se-asia/thai-cave-rescue-british-divers-first-to-find-boys-among-massive-international-team

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-07-24/thai-cave-rescue-australian-divers-receive-bravery-awards/10029542

http://time.com/5335284/thailand-cave-soccer-team-rescued/

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